A Bastille Day Meatless Monday Roundup: 4 Tartine Recipes

tomato sandwich

In celebration of Bastille Day, we’re putting a classic French treat on our Meatless Monday tables. Tartines are open-face sandwiches eaten morning, noon and night in France. Our tartine recipes are perfectly vegetarian for a delicious Meatless Monday treat.

Tartines can be made with pretty much anything you have at home, but our favorites involve the careful combination of a handful of ingredients that pair perfectly.

While our first sandwich may seem more Italian in influence than French, fresh tomatoes are a summer staple in Gallic households, and this bruschetta sandwich is no exception. Use top-quality ingredients for this sandwich: tomatoes, olive oil, fresh herbs, and excellent bread. The result will only be better than the sum of its parts.

avocado toast

Photography by Jim Hensley & Nina Dreyer Hensley.

Avocado toast has been popping up all over the Internet. This simple trend has many iterations, but ours plays off of the richness of avocado with a hint of spice from chili flakes. Lemon zest adds freshness to this treat that’s just as fantastic for lunch as for a simple snack.


Image: Arnaud 25

Cancoillotte is a runny French cheese made with buttermilk left to coagulate and then mixed with a variety of flavorings like herbs, alcohol and garlic. The result is perfectly spreadable or dippable, making it the ideal ingredient for a simple tartine. Cancoillotte can be difficult to find in the States, but you can try your hand at making cancoillotte and serving it on toasted country bread.


Image: Kirsten Hudson

The Danes are perhaps the most adept at creating delicious open-faced sandwiches, known as smørrebrød. A base of rye bread and butter can be accentuated with all sorts of toppings; vegetarian possibilities include boiled egg, cheese, cucumber, tomatoes and herbs. Try out your favorite combinations for Meatless Monday.

Top image: Marieke Kuijjer

Emily Monaco
Emily Monaco

Emily Monaco is an American writer based in Paris. She is particularly interested in the ways in which the stories of one person, one ingredient, one tradition can illustrate differences and similarities in international food culture. Her work has been published in the Wall Street Journal, Paste Magazine, and Serious Eats. Twitter: @emiglia | www.emilymmonaco.com.