About 10% of American women (and 5% of the general population) have unsightly, often painful corns and calluses. 

Extreme weather—hot summers and cold winters—exacerbate the problem, as skin tends to become drier during these seasons. 

“Corns and calluses are caused by friction and pressure on the feet, either from wearing shoes that don’t fit properly or from conditions such as arthritis, trauma, bunions or various deformities,” explains New York dermatologist Joshua Fox, MD.

 Be proactive, and you can look forward to wearing sandals and exposing your bare feet. Start by exfoliating dead skin: Soak your feet in water laced with organic essential oils, and treat rough spots with a pumice stone or foot file. Next, apply your favorite organic moisturizer to soften skin.

“If you are in good health, you don’t have to see a professional for corns and calluses, unless they hurt or bother your walking” Dr. Fox says. “But if you don’t like the way your feet look, are having pain or have certain medical conditions—including diabetes, poor circulation or numbness in the feet—it’s important that you see a doctor or podiatrist who can evaluate the problem and help you remove the corns and calluses.”