Brussels sprouts seldom make anyone’s Top 10 Favorite Vegetables list. Improper preparation is usually the culprit. When cooked correctly, this member of the cabbage family can be a delicious side dish, especially at your Easter table.

Brussels sprouts are cruciferous vegetables with cancer-fighting phytochemicals.

“They’re also high in vitamin C and are a good source of folate, vitamin A and potassium,” says Lona Sandon, MEd, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

When shopping at your local natural and organic food store, look for “small, compact, bright green sprouts for the best flavor,” Sandon advises.

We’ve posted several recipes for Brussels sprouts over the last few years, and links appear below. (Apologies in advance for the missing images; we changed photo servers after these recipes were posted in 2005.)

Tune in tomorrow for a new recipe: Brussels Sprouts With Mushrooms. And if you want to entice your kids, check out Pinky the Rat at the Brussels Sprout Museum.  

From Our Recipe Archives