Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the quintessential food-lover’s holiday. The abundance of flavorful autumnal fruits and vegetables find their way into stuffing, mashes, gravies, relishes and so much more goodness we look forward to being thankful for. And add to the apparent identity crisis our country now faces as dissonance with our economic system continues to spread, a growing intolerance of unlabeled genetically modified organisms now found in 80 percent of processed foods. So, on this Thanksgiving make sure you leave the corporate owned and toxic GMO foods off of your menu. Here’s how.

Turkey is the centerpiece for most thanksgiving tables, but unless you’re buying an organically-raised bird, you’re getting one that’s most likely fed a diet high in genetically modified soy and corn. And as we all know, you are what you eat eats. Same goes for vegan mock meats. Non-organic soy is most likely GMO, so opt for an organic option like the Tofurky.

If you make your own stuffing or if you buy a mix, make sure you check your bread ingredients as they can contain a number of genetically modified organisms like soy lecithin, dextrose, corn starch and even high fructose corn syrup. So can the store-bought seasoning blends. Instead, use your own mix of fresh herbs and spices and skip the packets or boxes.

Another possible spot for hidden GMOs is in store bought gravies. They can contain a number of gross ingredients that originate in genetically modified forms including canola oil and corn starch. Making your own is always going to taste better, anyway.

When it comes to Thanksgiving, dessert is a must; and pumpkin or apple pies top the list. Sometimes it’s helpful to take shortcuts, like pre-made crusts or fillings. Look out for high fructose corn syrup, soy or canola oil and corn starch in those. Make it from scratch or make an easier variation on the theme, like baked apples or pumpkin mousse.

Other places GMOs are likely hiding on your menu: cranberry relishes that contain corn syrup, salad dressings with canola, corn or soy oil and a number of added preservatives or flavor enhancers, canned soups, margarine and soft drinks.

Keep in touch with Jill on Twitter @jillettinger

Image: Rhett Sutphin