From Our Friends: August 23, 2013

Sheep

Welcome to this week’s installment of From Our Friends, our weekly roundup where we highlight some of our favorite posts from the past week and more from our friends and partners around the web. This week’s edition includes the nitty gritty on antibiotics, adorable accessories to send toddlers off to preschool for the first time, the ten commandments of getting a good night’s sleep, how to find relief from adult ADHD through focused yoga practice, tips for tripling your workout effectiveness, and how environmental estrogen is infiltrating our lives. Enjoy!

1. Sick! Experience Life gave readers the low down, dirty truth about antibiotics. The drugs’ overuse is rendering the them more and more ineffective, and mutated superbugs are developing in resistence. And if you think the medical industry is the only culprit, think again– factory farming is rampant with abuse of antibiotics due to the staggering numbers of weak and unheathy livestock the process creates. 

2. They grow up so fast, don’t they? If you’re getting set to send your kiddo to preschool for the first time, MightyNest hand-selected a great roundup of adorable accessories that are affordable, convenient, durable, and specifically made to accommodate toddlers’ little fingers, hands, and bodies.

3. If you’re merely sleeping but not resting, stop counting herds of sheep and simply count to ten instead. Blisstree‘s ten commandments of good sleep will have you hitting the hay the right way and retiring those poor, overworked little lambs.

4. Practice makes perfect. The YogiTimes explained why channeling frustrations and distractions into your yoga practice can help conquer the symptoms of adult ADHD.

5. If you’re feeling low about your workout plateau, The Organic Whey shared sixteen tips to triple your workout effectiveness, from Zen Habits

6. EcoSalon explored the serious side effects of environmental estrogen on Mother Nature, and how it impacts– you guessed it– nearly every aspect of our lives. “Foreign” estrogens, also called xenoestrogens, come by way of environmental chemicals, including those found in many types of plastics, detergents, heavy metals and pesticides.

You can follow Spencer on Twitter @SpencerKent

Image: BethTourek.com

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