fart code

If you think your child is above fart jokes, guess again. They’re most likely not, and they may even be wondering: is farting healthy? Now, there’s a new smart phone app that uses farting to help children make healthier food decisions.

The app, called Fart Code, was developed by Goodby Silverstein & Partners and comes with (what else?) a “Fartometer” which makes fart sounds based on how the body is likely to respond to ingredients in foods.

“Get smart from your fart!” the app producers say in a video on the app’s website.

Using a barcode scanner, the kids can use Fart Code to scan any food item with their smart phones. Ingredients that can cause gas are recognized by the app, which “produces the appropriate fart noise and vibration; a rough equivalent of how your digestive system would process the ingredients,” reports Marketing Land. “If your grocery store suddenly starts sounding like a bunch of gymnasts farting mid-routine, you’ll know the app is a success.”

The farts come with “fart emojis” that the kids can text to friends along with links that lets their friends (or proud Papas) hear the farts.

Marketing Land reports that schools in San Francisco have already signed up to use the Fart Code app in classes to help answer the question: is farting healthy? The answer, of course, relies on what foods kids are putting into their bodies. And that’s the real discussion here—teaching children about their food decisions. Especially since the government seems to be unclear about its position on cleaning up school lunches.

According to recent research, regular farting—up to 18 times per day—is an indicator of healthy gut microbes. And according to kids everywhere, that’s disgustingly awesome.

Watch the video for more info on the Fart Code app.

Find Jill on Twitter @jillettinger

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image via Fart Code