nestfresh non-gmo project certified dried eggs

NestFresh, a Colorado-based producer of non-GMO, certified free-range eggs, recently launched a new line of frozen, liquid and dried egg ingredients. Like the fresh eggs, these substitutes will be certified by the Non-GMO Project, making NestFresh the first brand to offer such a product to retailers and manufacturers.

Eggs are a big source of protein and an essential ingredient for many baking recipes. Yet they’re the by-product of a poultry industry that is often inhuman and sometimes downright disgusting. When shopping for fresh eggs, it’s possible to seek out non-GMO, free-range alternatives that are better for us and the planet, but what about when buying other foods like store-made cakes or instant baking mixes? These products are often made with frozen, liquid, and dried eggs, which are often lower quality than fresh.

The new offering from NestFresh now makes it possible for companies utilizing these ingredients to confidently label their products as GMO-free.

To achieve non-GMO egg status, NestFresh chickens are fed non-GMO feed consisting of corn and soybeans, which are most at risk for genetic modification. There is a routine testing schedule for the non-GMO feed, which is approved by the Non-GMO Project. Being on the non-GMO diet allows the chickens to produce non-GMO eggs.

“We are seeing this as a new trend in non-GMO transparency and demand,” said Michael Sencer, executive vice president of Hidden Villa Ranch (NestFresh’s parent company), in a press release. “We anticipate more companies to follow suit as the mass public continues to insist that GMOs have to go.”

Thanks to their partnership with the Non-GMO Project, companies using NestFresh products can be 100 percent non-GMO compliant. For the first time, Whole Foods and other stores that offer gourmet bakery items and ready to eat meals can purchase non-GMO egg ingredients from NestFresh for all-natural cookies, cakes, brownies or prepared sauces.

Related on Organic Authority:

How to Buy the Perfect Eggs

8 Reasons to Love Organic Eggs

20 Unusual Ways to Use Eggs (And Egg Cartons!)

Cropped image via Foodring