indoorherbs-ccflcr-beautifulcataya

Yup, it’s officially winter out there. But you still want to grow your culinary herbs, darn it! Don’t fret, you can easily bring your outdoor herbs indoors for the nippy months. We’ve got five simple tips for growing those herbs indoors throughout the winter season.

1)    Play Mother Nature with your indoor weather conditions. Healthy plants thrive best with lots of light, so make sure your herbs are exposed to 6 hours of natural light or 14 hours of artificial light. And keep them somewhere where the temperature stays mildly cool to warm — think Seattle. Sixty degrees at night to 70 degrees during the day is ideal for your budding herbs.

2)    Location, location, location! House your herbs in the kitchen or bathroom, where they are most likely to stay slightly warm and humid naturally.

3)    Love that soil. Keep the soil of your herbs moist, but don’t over water — and never let your plant sit in standing water. The roots will rot! Grow all herbs in a clay pot with holes for drainage. And start with an organic fertilizer for ultra eco-love — or better yet, create your own compost.

4)    Wash that plant! Not really. But if your plant becomes infested with insects, which is common with indoor gardening, you can remove them with a soapy plant bath. Fill a large pot or kitchen sink with diluted soapy water, and gently tip the top of your herbs into the water, holding the base of the plant secure with your hands. Give it a few swishes in the soapy water and the pests should be swept away. If your plant is too delicate to turn upside down, use a spray bottle to spray the soapy solution onto the leaves and infected areas.

5)    Choose your herbs wisely. Some herbs naturally lend themselves better to indoor growing conditions. Parsley, basil, sage and thyme are known to hold up stronger inside. Extra perk — they are all perfect herb solutions for winter stews, casseroles and roasts. Isn’t it great when those things work out?

image: beautifulcataya