Pest-Proof Your Garden… the Natural Way!

keeping pests out of your garden

If you’re lucky, your garden is probably in full bloom right now. But while the tomatoes, zucchini and lettuces you’ve been tenderly caring for all spring and summer are meant to end up on your plate, they’re also probably attracting other interested animals. Instead of using dangerous deterrents that could harm both the animals and the loved ones you’re feeding, try using some of these all-natural methods to keep your garden pest free!

Useful Plants

Certain plants attract animals; others are natural deterrents. Growing chives, basil and mint can help keep aphids at bay; mint is also a great ant deterrent. Thyme, dill and cilantro will keep away leafhoppers and potato beetles. These herbs are not only useful, but delicious in your cooking!

Grow garlic to keep rabbits from invading your garden. If you need a quick fix, infuse water with garlic and spray it over your plants.

Garden Additions

Aside from fencing your garden, which can help solve a lot of pest problems, try these creative additions to help protect your garden.

To keep your fruit bushes’ bounty to yourself, throw netting over them to deter birds from feasting on the fruit.

To keep slugs away, consider placing eggshells in the ground. Crushed eggshells are sharp, which keeps slugs and snails from invading your garden.

To keep groundhogs and gophers from eating bulb plants, bury a wire mesh fence underground before planting. By fencing beneath the plants instead of around them, these underground animals won’t be able to access the bulbs they so love.

For other tips, check out our guide on 5 Ways to Control Pests, or see some of our natural garden pest repellent recipes.

Image: USDAGov

Emily Monaco
Emily Monaco

Emily Monaco is an American writer based in Paris. She is particularly interested in the ways in which the stories of one person, one ingredient, one tradition can illustrate differences and similarities in international food culture. Her work has been published in the Wall Street Journal, Paste Magazine, and Serious Eats. Twitter: @emiglia |