seawater

Remember when you were little and you used to collect sand and shells from the beach? Ok, we actually still do that but now we’re adding one more thing to our beach comber list: seawater. Why you ask … because the newest culinary trend is cooking with salt water.

This salty H2O is used both as an ingredient and as a way of cooking. Many chefs are boiling shellfish like mussels, clams, lobsters, crabs, and shrimp in it to preserve its natural taste. Even everyday items like pasta, potatoes, veggies, and chicken are getting boiled in seawater and some chefs use it as an ingredient in soups, sauces, and dressings for that fresh-from-the-ocean taste.

The American Fish Restaurant in Las Vegas poaches diver scallops, Dayboat cod, and Loch Duart salmon in ocean water, and the bare bones Trenton Bridge Lobster Pound in Trenton, Maine serves up boiled lobster, steamed clams, lobster stew, clam chowder, and lobster and crab sandwiches – all cooked in water fresh from the ocean.

Not only does the special ingredient add amazing flavor, but seawater and sea salt have many health benefits. Since your food will be seasoned naturally with salt water, there is no need for additional salt and little need for extra spices which will cut back on your salt intake. Sea salt is also processed naturally through the evaporation of seawater which leaves behind minerals that are often removed during the lengthy production used to make table salt.

Even chefs that aren’t close to the ocean aren’t letting that stop them. Some are importing the water and one company, Acquamara has boxed it up (yes, like boxed water) and is selling it for $6/3 liters. If you’re lucky enough to have access to the ocean, make sure you filter the water before using it to remove sand and dirt and make sure the water is tested regularly and free of toxins.

Will you try this salty cooking trend?