Honey

I really dig eating oatmeal that’s drizzled with local honey for breakfast. Or lunch, really. OK, OK. I enjoy carbohydrates and sweets anytime of day. But recently, I decided to give veganism a try and have had to temporarily say goodbye to my favorite breakfast topper. Luckily, I haven’t missed the honey too much because with a bit of research, I found some tasty honey alternatives that serve my sweet cravings well:

1. Agave nectar

Honey and agave nectar taste very similar, in my opinion. When agave nectar is processed, it retains either a dark amber, or light brown color. The darker agave nectar tastes similar to caramel, and the light-colored nectar tastes similar to a more delicate honey.

2. Date paste

This is for the DIYers out there. Simply soak pitted Medjool dates in water, orange juice, or apple juice for an hour, or more. Blend the mixture in a food processor. Use more or less liquid, depending on how thick you want your paste. This recipe suggests you add 1/2 cup liquid for every cup of dates. Store the paste in your refrigerator for one week. If you like your sweetener full of antioxidants, minerals and fiber, this is the choice for you. I’m guessing this would taste rockin’ on some hot cereal.

3. Coconut nectar

Coconut nectar is made from the reduced sap of coconut palms. Coconut nectar is high in amino acids, vitamins and minerals. The nectar also is low-glycemic. According to Vegetarian Times magazine, coconut nectar is made up primarily of inulin and has a mild coconut flavor. Drizzle on granola for some extra yums.

And for you breakfast bread bakers: Here are a few non-honey alternatives to consider for baking purposes:

4. Barley malt syrup
5. Brown rice syrup
6. Maple syrup
7. Molasses

Image: flood