KOMBUCHA

Kombucha? Didn’t he fight Hulk Hogan at WrestleMania in the 80s? Actually, Kombucha isn’t a luchador. Kombucha is fermented tea, historically drank in Russia, China, and Japan, and believed to have healing properties. So it’s no surprise that Kombuca is becoming a popular item in health food stores.

I’ve never tried it, but apparently it taste vinegary, which doesn’t sound too appetizing. Why drink it? Put it on a salad!  But apparently it’s more like apple cider, than vinegar. It has a tart and tangy taste.

Steven Dickman, chief operating officer of High Country Kombucha, in Colorado, a bottler of Kombucha, says most people think Kombucha tastes weird at first, but 15 minutes later, they come back for more? Same goes for Chinese food, right?

And that lingering thirst for Kombucha is good for business, with the growing demand High Country Kombucha is stepping up production to keep local supermarkets stocked up, recently moving into a larger production facility.

Some say Kombucha has medicinal uses, like improving eyesight, aiding in cancer recovery, and helping joint health, but these claims are largely unproven.

Kombucha is made by adding a culture to sweetened tea, usually black tea, and the mixture is covered with a cheese cloth to prevent any dust or bacteria from getting into the soup, but it still allows gas from the tea to be released.

During the process a mushroom-looking thing (pictures) develops on top of the mixture, which is later removed and ultimately the remaining liquid becomes what you drink. Oh man, I’m not drinking mushroom juice. I don’t know about this Kombucha. Bleh! I’ll stick to organic beer and mojitos.

But Kombucha, like coffee and beer, is an acquired taste. Good thing, because if it’s anything like coffee and beer, it’ll be a huge hit. Americans love getting wired and drunk! Well, at least I do. Yippee!

Image credit: Iggy Uncensored