57 Major Food Companies Switching to Cage-Free Eggs [List]

57 Major Food Companies Switching to Cage-Free Eggs [List]

Someday in the not-so-distant future, asking for “cage-free eggs” will be the same as simply asking for “eggs.” The industry norm for egg-laying hens is changing so fast that within a decade most of the eggs in this country will be cage-free.

That of course, wasn’t always the case.

Battery cages have been the standard in industrialized chicken farming for half a century.

“The animal movement has battled this inhumane practice for decades on end,” explains Wayne Pacelle President and CEO, The Humane Society of the United States.

“In the years ahead, we won’t find battery cages in massive warehouses in Iowa or Indiana, but in images documented in books, websites, and films that recount the ugly, harsh era of mass confinement of animals. That era finally faded away when we all put our shoulders into securing enduring reform, and major food sellers decided that their shelves would no longer be stocked with a backstory of cruelty and suffering.”

Organic Authority has reported on announcements from retailers, manufacturers, and restaurant chains all committing to going cage-free, including: Target, Trader Joe’s, Costco, Unilever, Nestlé, ConAgra, General Mills, Kellogg, and most recently, Kraft Heinz, Kroger, and Albertsons.

“I’m confident that within the next month we’ll see other retailers come on board, which would ensure that all sector leaders within the food industry have determined that cages within egg production will be eliminated – by all accounts, within the next nine years,” says Pacelle.

While some companies like Whole Foods Market and Chipotle were early adopters of cage-free eggs, the majority of the food industry is just getting on board. And fast.

So, just who have made cage-free egg commitments recently?

Here are 57 of the biggest names in the food or food service industries making the switch:

  1. Albertsons (2025)
  2. Applebee’s (2025)
  3. Aramark (2020 for liquid eggs)
  4. Arby’s (2025)
  5. Au bon pain (2017)
  6. Barilla (2020)
  7. BJ’s Wholesale (2025)
  8. Bob Evans (2025)
  9. Burger King (2017)
  10. California Pizza Kitchen (2022)
  11. Campbell Soup Co. (2025)
  12. Caribou Coffee (2020)
  13. Carl’s Jr. (2025)
  14. Cheesecake Factory (2016)
  15. Compass Group (2019 for liquid eggs)
  16. ConAgra (2025)
  17. Costco (2025)
  18. Cracker Barrel (2026)
  19. CVS (2025)
  20. Delaware North (2016 for shell and liquid eggs)
  21. Denny’s (2026)
  22. Dunkin Donuts (2025)
  23. Einstein Bros. Bagels (2020)
  24. Flowers Foods (Tastykake, Wonder bread) (2025)
  25. General Mills (2025)
  26. Giant Supermarket (2022)
  27. Hardee’s (2025)
  28. Hilton Worldwide (2017)
  29. IHOP (2025)
  30. Jack in the Box (2025)
  31. Kraft Heinz (2025)
  32. Kroger (2025)
  33. Mars (2020)
  34. McDonalds (2025)
  35. Nestle (2020)
  36. Outback Steakhouse (2025)
  37. Panera (2020)
  38. PF Chang’s (2025)
  39. Qdoba (2025)
  40. Quiznos (2025)
  41. Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines (2022)
  42. Sara Lee (1 million of its eggs per year)
  43. Shake Shack (2016)
  44. Sodexo (2020 for liquid eggs)
  45. Sonic (2025)
  46. Starbucks (2020)
  47. Stop & Shop (2022)
  48. Subway (2025)
  49. Taco Bell (2016)
  50. Taco John’s (2025)
  51. Target (2025 for shell eggs)
  52. TGI Friday’s (2025)
  53. The Cheesecake Factory (2016)
  54. Trader Joe’s (2025)
  55. Unilever (2020)
  56. Wendy’s (2020)
  57. White Castle (2025)

Thanks to Cage Free Future for compiling much of this data.

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Related on Organic Authority

Trader Joe’s Sets 2025 Deadline for Cage-Free Eggs in All Stores

Cage-Free Eggs to Take Over at Your Local Target Store Starting in 2025

Costco Switches to Cage-Free Eggs, Changes the Industry for Good

eggs image via Shutterstock

Jill Ettinger

Jill Ettinger is a Los Angeles-based journalist and editor focused on the global food system and how it intersects with our cultural traditions, diet preferences, health, and politics. She is the senior editor for sister websites OrganicAuthority.com and EcoSalon.com, and works as a research associate and editor with the Cornucopia Institute, the organic industry watchdog group. Jill has been featured in The Huffington Post, MTV, Reality Sandwich, and Eat Drink Better. www.jillettinger.com.