Homemade Cashew Milk with Cinnamon and Maple Syrup

homemade cashew milk

Creamy, sweet, and dairy-free, this homemade cashew milk is about to transform your morning turmeric latte, bulletproof coffee, and vegan mac and cheese. Get ready to use this cashew milk for just about everything.

Although dominated by almond milk, the non-dairy milk scene includes many delicious players including milks made of hemp seed, flaxseed, pumpkin seed, coconut, oat, sesame seed, rice, macadamia, and even Brazil nuts. As an alternative milk connoisseur, (whatever, cow’s milk) I’ve dabbled with homemade versions of many of these types of nut milks. The nut milk I create the most often, and my favorite by far, is homemade cashew milk with the sweet addition of cinnamon and maple syrup.

Cream-colored, kidney shaped cashews are a staple in my kitchen. Not only do these little nuts turn into creamy homemade cashew milk with a quick whirl in the blender, they’re also nutrient-packed and easy to incorporate into other dishes (like homemade cashew butter) as well. When purchasing cashews, look for raw and unsalted organic versions which haven’t been processed with refined oils and extra additives.

homemade cashew milk

The Health Benefits of Cashews

Cashews contain protein, zinc, copper, magnesium, phosphorus, fiber, and antioxidants.

They are also a good source of healthy fats including monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats, both of which are associated with reduced risk of obesity, diabetes, certain types of cancers, and heart disease.

In fact, research published in the British Journal of Nutrition, which looked at four large epidemiological studies, found that subjects who consumed nuts regularly had a lowered risk of heart disease.

Individuals who ate nuts at least four times per week showed on average a 37 percent reduced risk of coronary heart disease, compared to those who never or rarely ate nuts, according to the study. Even better, each additional serving of nuts per week was associated with an average 8.3 percent reduced risk of coronary heart disease. Just another excuse to have a spoonful (or two) of cashew butter a day.

homemade cashew milk

Uses for Cashew Milk

Just like other milks, cashew milk has endless uses and possibilities. I find that it provides a less nutty taste and creamier flavor and texture than other non-dairy milks. Swap your cow’s milk for homemade cashew milk in:

Whatever you use this homemade cashew milk for, it’s sure to be creamy and delightfully delicious.

homemade cashew milk

Homemade Cashew Milk with Cinnamon and Maple Syrup Recipe
Rate this recipe
2 ratings

Cook Time: 2 minutes

Yield: 5 cups

Serving Size: 1 cup

Calories per serving: 183

Fat per serving: 12.7 g

Saturated fat per serving: 2.5 g

Carbs per serving: 14.6 g

Protein per serving: 4.2 g

Fiber per serving: 0.9 g

Sugar per serving: 6.3 g

Sodium per serving: 58 mg

Homemade Cashew Milk with Cinnamon and Maple Syrup Recipe

Ingredients

  • I cup raw unsalted cashews
  • 4 cups filtered water
  • 2 Tablespoons maple syrup
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • Pinch of sea salt

Instructions

  1. Soak raw cashews in water for at least five hours, or overnight. Strain cashews through a fine mesh sieve and rinse well.
  2. Add soaked and rinsed cashews to a high-speed blender along with water. Blend on high for two minutes, or until cashews are completely pulverized.
  3. Add in maple syrup, cinnamon, vanilla, and sea salt, and blend for 30 seconds more.
  4. Store cashew milk in an airtight jar in the refrigerator where it will keep for three to four days. Shake jar well before using and enjoy!
http://www.organicauthority.com/homemade-cashew-milk-with-cinnamon-and-maple-syrup-recipe/

Related On Organic Authority
Are Store-Bought Milks All They’re Cracked Up To Be? Here’s the Nutty Truth
Lose the Lactose: How to Make Nondairy Milks at Home
Not Milk? A Guide to Nondairy Milks

Photos by Kate Gavlick

Kate Gavlick
Kate Gavlick

Kate is a Nutritionist with a Master's of Nutrition from the National University of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon and the blogger and photographer of Vegukate. Kate believes in nourishing the whole body with real, vibrant foods that feed the mind, body, soul, gut, and every single little cell. Her philosophy is simple when it comes to food and nourishment: cut the processed junk, listen to your body, eat by the seasons, eat plates and bowls filled with color, stress less, and enjoy every single bite. When she's not cooking in her too tiny Portland kitchen, Kate can be found perusing farmer's markets, doing barre classes, hiking, reading, and exploring.